Introduction to Nonviolent Communication

Nonviolent Communication Origins
Nonviolent Communication Origins
Developed by Marshall Rosenberg in the 1960s, Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is based on the principles of nonviolence—the natural state of compassion when no violence is present in the heart.
Four NVC Components
Four NVC Components
NVC guides us to express how we are, without blame or criticism, and to receive how others are with empathy. It's structured around four components: observation, feeling, need, and request.
Observation Without Evaluation
Observation Without Evaluation
NVC starts with observation free of evaluation. Instead of labeling someone as 'lazy,' describe the specific behavior without inferring motive, thus preventing defensiveness.
Identifying and Expressing Feelings
Identifying and Expressing Feelings
Expressing feelings in NVC is crucial. It requires differentiating between feelings and thoughts, e.g., 'I feel overlooked' versus 'I think you're ignoring me.'
Acknowledging Underlying Needs
Acknowledging Underlying Needs
Every feeling is rooted in an underlying need. NVC teaches us to identify and articulate these needs, which are universal and can lead to more understanding and connection.
Making Empathetic Requests
Making Empathetic Requests
Instead of demands, NVC encourages making clear requests in relation to the needs we've expressed. Requests are specific, actionable, and free of demand to foster goodwill and collaboration.
The Power of Empathy
The Power of Empathy
Empathy in NVC is listening with deep compassion, imagining the feelings and needs behind someone's words. It's a powerful tool that fosters mutual respect and understanding.
Learn.xyz Mascot
Who developed Nonviolent Communication?
Carl Rogers
Marshall Rosenberg
Albert Bandura