Exploring Emotional Intelligence

Defining Emotional Intelligence
Defining Emotional Intelligence
Emotional Intelligence (EI), or Emotional Quotient (EQ), is the ability to understand, use, and manage emotions. Surprisingly, it's a relatively new concept, coined by Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer in 1990.
EI's Four Core Skills
EI's Four Core Skills
EI comprises four core skills: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. It's intriguing that EI predicts performance 58% of the time, outperforming IQ in this regard.
Neuroplasticity and EI
Neuroplasticity and EI
Due to neuroplasticity, the brain's ability to reorganize itself, you can enhance your EI throughout your life. This contradicts the old belief that emotional skills are static.
Emotions as Data
Emotions as Data
Emotions are data. They reveal information about our environment and internal state. Surprisingly, understanding emotions is like learning a language, which can be mastered with practice.
EI in Leadership
EI in Leadership
Leaders with high EI create more connected and motivated teams. Astonishingly, a study found that 90% of top performers have high EI, while 20% of bottom performers have high EI.
Cultural Impact on EI
Cultural Impact on EI
EI is influenced by culture. For instance, Eastern philosophies often integrate emotional balance, which can lead to higher EI. This suggests that EI is not just personal but also cultural.
Improving Your EI
Improving Your EI
Improving EI involves mindfulness, empathy practice, and emotional regulation strategies. Startlingly, practicing gratitude can increase EI by enhancing empathy and reducing aggression.
Learn.xyz Mascot
Who coined 'Emotional Intelligence' term?
Salovey and Mayer, 1990
Goleman in 1985
Darwin in 1872