Introduction to Cherokee History and Culture

Introduction to Cherokee
Introduction to Cherokee
The Cherokee, or Aniyvwiya, meaning 'Principal People', are indigenous to the Southeastern United States. Today, they're one of the largest federally recognized tribes.
Cherokee Syllabary Invention
Cherokee Syllabary Invention
In 1821, Sequoyah introduced the Cherokee syllabary, revolutionizing written communication among the Cherokee. His syllabary remains crucial for preserving the language and culture.
The Trail of Tears
The Trail of Tears
The 1830 Indian Removal Act led to the forced relocation known as the Trail of Tears, a devastating journey that claimed thousands of Cherokee lives.
Three Federally Recognized Groups
Three Federally Recognized Groups
There are three federally recognized Cherokee tribes: the Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band in Oklahoma, and the Eastern Band in North Carolina.
Cherokee Nation's Matrilineal Society
Cherokee Nation's Matrilineal Society
Cherokee society was traditionally matrilineal. Clan identity and inheritance were determined through the mother, signifying the central role of women.
Ancient Cherokee Agriculture
Ancient Cherokee Agriculture
Cherokees were skilled farmers, cultivating the 'Three Sisters': corn, beans, and squash. These crops were staple foods and central to their agrarian culture.
Cherokee Language Today
Cherokee Language Today
The Cherokee language is endangered, with efforts to revitalize it through immersion schools and digital resources, ensuring its survival for future generations.
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What does 'Aniyvwiya' mean?
Principal People
Federally Recognized
Cherokee Syllabary