The Salt March: Gandhi's Nonviolent Resistance Against British Rule

Salt Tax Background
Salt Tax Background
British Salt Act of 1882 prohibited Indians from collecting or selling salt, a staple in their diet. The tax affected millions, symbolizing the British control over Indian resources and daily life.
Gandhi's Nonviolent Protest
Gandhi's Nonviolent Protest
Gandhi planned a nonviolent protest against the salt tax, aiming to produce salt from seawater. This act of civil disobedience was designed to inspire mass participation and challenge British authority.
Salt March Commences
Salt March Commences
Beginning March 12, 1930, Gandhi and 78 followers embarked on a 240-mile march to the Arabian Sea. Thousands joined along the way, drawing global attention to India’s independence struggle.
International Media Frenzy
International Media Frenzy
The Salt March garnered extensive international press coverage, spotlighting the injustices of British rule. It was a strategic masterpiece, leveraging the power of emerging global media.
Women in Salt Satyagraha
Women in Salt Satyagraha
Women played a critical role, for the first time in large numbers, in the Salt March, breaking societal norms. Sarojini Naidu became a prominent face, leading the Dharasana Satyagraha after Gandhi's arrest.
Viceroy's Dilemma
Viceroy's Dilemma
The Viceroy, Lord Irwin, was caught in a dilemma. Repression could provoke further unrest, but tolerance seemed like capitulation. The march tested British responses to civil disobedience.
Salt March Aftermath
Salt March Aftermath
The Salt March didn't immediately overturn the salt laws, but it shifted the struggle for Indian independence. It's considered a turning point, leading to the eventual end of British rule in India.
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What did the 1882 Salt Act prohibit?
Salt export by British only
Indians collecting or selling salt
Eating salt in Indian meals