The Making and Uses of Brown Sugar

Sugar: A Brief Introduction
Sugar: A Brief Introduction
Sugar is sourced from sugarcane or sugar beets. The process of making brown sugar begins with extracting juice from sugarcane, which is then purified, heated, and crystallized to form sugar crystals.
Refining to Raw Sugar
Refining to Raw Sugar
The crystallized sugar is spun in centrifuges to remove molasses, resulting in raw sugar. This raw sugar has a brownish color due to the residual molasses content, which also adds a distinctive flavor.
Molasses: Key to Brownness
Molasses: Key to Brownness
Molasses, a byproduct of sugar production, contributes to the brown color and moist texture. Brown sugar contains 3-7% molasses, which influences its color and taste intensity.
Creating Commercial Brown Sugar
Creating Commercial Brown Sugar
Commercial brown sugar is often made by blending white sugar with molasses. The quantity of molasses added determines whether the result is light or dark brown sugar.
Nutritional Differences Explored
Nutritional Differences Explored
Though similar in calorie content, brown sugar has slightly higher calcium, iron, and potassium levels due to the molasses. However, these differences are minimal and not significant nutritionally.
Brown Sugar in Cooking
Brown Sugar in Cooking
Brown sugar adds a deep, caramel-like flavor to baked goods. It also keeps them moist due to its ability to attract and retain water, making it a favorite in recipes like cookies and sauces.
Unrefined Sugars: An Alternative
Unrefined Sugars: An Alternative
Unrefined sugars, such as muscovado, retain much of their molasses content without blending. They offer a stronger flavor, making them a gourmet alternative for discerning palates and specific recipes.
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What is sugar sourced from?
Corn and rice
Sugarcane or sugar beets
Honey and fruits